Piedmont Virginia Digital History: The Land Between the Rivers
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Proposed African American Schools

JPG-School-Description.jpg
JPG-School-Map.jpg

Dublin Core

Title

Proposed African American Schools

Subject

Early African American Schools
Standards of Learning VS.1a, VS.1g, VS.7c, VS.8a, VS.8b, USII.1a, USII.1d, USII.3b, USII.4c

Description

“Schools may have been opened sooner in this district [Louisa Courthouse District] than some others, because the County seat was located here, it was more accessible, more thickly populated and easier for a number of people to assemble for action.” This quote is from a narrative written by Zelda Morton, the first Supervisor for Negro Education, about early Negro schools in Louisa County.

African Americans, even those from older generations, knew little of Negro schools prior to 1870. Zelda Morton continues, “during this period the Negroes provided the place for teaching, the fuel for the school, and boarded the teacher from house to house.” The earliest school African Americans can recall is one started by Julia Shore."

This attached document from the Letters of the Freedmen's Bureau at Louisa Court House lends proof that there were schools proposed before 1870, and it validates Morton’s hypothesis that there had been earlier schools located in the Louisa Courthouse. The documents shown here call for the start of eight schools in eight different districts of Louisa County, one of those districts being the Louisa Courthouse District. The Louisa Courthouse District School is the only one of the eight proposed schools that has documentation of operation. The other schools never operated because of financial issues. The map shows the locations of where the proposed schools would exist.

Source

National Archives' Freedman's Bureau Records

Publisher

Louisa County Historical Society.

Date

August 26, 1866

Rights

RIGHTS AND REPRODUCTION POLICY

All items in our archives have been donated to The Louisa County Historical Society with express permission to use them only for not-for-profit purposes of education and individual research. We make them available online to further those ends. Anyone wishing to use images online or in printed publications must obtain express written permission to do so from the Louisa County Historical Society and the legal copyright holder. Users assume full responsibility for disputes arising from copyright violations or invasions of privacy.

Format

Document

Language

English

Type

Document

Identifier

054_

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No