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Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) is credited with the establishment of the Rosenwald Foundation, an organization that worked to promote and improve African-American schools. The fund helped build over 5,300 schools across the South, including 381 r in…

This is a photograph of Carrie Milhado and Mildred Jennings at the Mineral School

Zelda Carter Fletcher Morton was born on June 6, 1874 on Sylvania in Green Springs. Her parents, Andrew and Sarah Carter, were married while enslaved and their marriage was recorded by the Freedmen’s Bureau in 1866 in the Cohabitation Lists.…

Anna T. Jeanes, born in 1822 in Quaker Pennsylvania, became the sole inheritor of her family fortune. Her Christian faith led her to establish The Friends Boarding House, a home for the ill and elderly. Two years before her death in 1907, Jeanes…

This photograph is an image of Aunt Dinah Robinson who served as the janitor at the Mineral High School during the era of segregation. In most cases, it was African Americans who worked as the janitors at white schools, and they witnessed the…

Early African American schools were designed to advance younger generations of African Americans. Within this community of individuals there was a belief that, as an African American became more educated and continued to exceed in society, the…

The historic Shady Grove School was born out of a need to provide a facility for the education of black students in the Jackson District near Gum Spring. In the words of former State Supervisor of Negro Education(1925), W. D. Gresham,"the Shady Grove…

William Jackson Walton served as the Superintendent of the Jackson District from 1871 until 1884 when he became one of the earliest Superintendents of Schools in Louisa County. As Superintendent, Walton kept records of how many schools were in each…

“Schools may have been opened sooner in this district [Louisa Courthouse District] than some others, because the County seat was located here, it was more accessible, more thickly populated and easier for a number of people to assemble for…

This pay receipt demonstrates a short period of equality between white and African American teachers in the Jackson District of Louisa. Later, this pay receipt, for Alice Burrows, an African American teacher, would be much lower than that of a white…

This pay receipt demonstrates a short period of equality between white and African American teachers in the Jackson District of Louisa. Later, this pay receipt, for W.S. Bagby, a white teacher, would be much higher than that of an African American…